Signs That You’ve Outgrown Github, Part 2: Task Management

In my last post, I introduced a set of features (and failings) that might have you wondering if Github can grow with your team. In this post, I’m talking about tasks, workflow and keeping things moving.

Github’s Workflow Is Simple And Cool

When you’re starting out, Github’s approach is really helpful. You can create a task with just a summary sentence. If you want, you can add a more detailed description and some labels.

Tasks are open or they’re closed, and you can close a task with a commit. From a developer’s perspective, it’s wonderful to grab a task and write some code, then update the task without having to visit the website. You get to stay in your IDE, your command-line — whatever tools you’re using to do the work.

The Real World Gets Complicated

These features work very well for teams that are just starting out, and for projects that may have somewhat disconnected participants (e.g., open-source projects). But as your team begins to deal with marketing, sales, customers, or even other dev teams, you may rub up against some important limitations.

There’s more to life(cycle) than Open and Closed

Very often, there are other pieces to your workflow than just coding. There could be planning, design, code review, testing, deployment, and other activities. It’s pretty common to reflect some of that workflow in the status, so that everyone can tell where a task is and what needs to be done next, without having to re-read then entire history.

Closing a task just because you’ve committed some code assumes that everything else will go right. Usually, committing code is the beginning of the process, not the end.

Not everything fits in the same box

Not everything is a task to be done in the code. Sometimes, you want a place to flesh out a user story, or discuss the design for a specific page. Maybe you need to track servers, or which customers have which version of your product.

You might be able to jam these different kinds of information into a Github task, but it ends up being a bigger version of the labeling problem from my previous posting.

What’s going on?

Github has some pretty decent release/milestone tools, and you can group tasks into a milestone to track overall completion. That project-level view can be great, but what about planning and tracking your current sprint? Or planning and tracking your own day?

Standups get a lot easier when you can automatically see what the team worked on recently, and when the team can identify what they plan to work on.

What’s really important?

This is one that everyone runs up against pretty quickly. Putting a priority on each task allows the team to keep moving, by knowing which tasks to work next. Without prioritization, everyone’s just guessing about what is most important.

Github has no way to prioritize tasks. Even if you use a label (to beat a dead horse), you won’t be able to sort them.

Plans get tangled up

It’s pretty easy to enter and manage tasks in Github, and depending on your level of detail one task might be completely stand-alone from another. Almost inevitably, though, a task will be blocked, waiting for some other task to finish. Your new web page needs an API update from someone else. A customer’s support ticket might be waiting on a bug that someone is working on. Or a use case can’t be complete until all three web pages are working together.

The ability to manage dependencies has been asked and discussed many times over the years, and Github just doesn’t want to take on the complexity. It doesn’t have to be a Gantt chart, but making sure that everyone knows when tasks are blocked (and when they become unblocked) is key to maintaining project momentum.

A More Realistic Approach

First off, don’t expect Github to change. The simplicity of their task management is perfectly suited for many, MANY projects. It’s easy to get started with, and is a great place for sharing open-source and personal projects.

But maybe your team has started to suffer from that simplicity, and you’re looking for something to fill in the gaps that Github leaves. You might even be tempted to try one of the dozens of “bolt-on” tools that claim to integrate tightly with Github.

Instead, let me suggest that what you really need is something that was built from the ground up to start simple, grow to be comprehensive, and stay elegant. Something that’s easy to use, but allows more complexity as you grow into it.

Here are a few more simple pieces of advice:

  • Instead of shying away from adding different status values, be honest about the workflow you want and make the tool serve your needs.
  • Consider that maybe you need a different set of fields for tracking use cases or UI designs, versus coding tasks, versus customer support.
  • Don’t settle for something that’s too simplistic, or a patchwork of loosely-coupled tools, when working around their limitations will cost you time that’s better spent on your actual mission.

If your tools are preventing you from improving your process, maybe it’s time to improve your tools.

Come back soon for another sign that you might have outgrown Github .

Come try GForge Next for simple, comprehensive and elegant collaboration.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s