GForge 23.0 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 23.0. This release is primarily a bug-fix release with a fair number of new features included!

Key Highlights in 23.0

  • SSO – Many improvements to our Single Sign-On support. 
  • Security – Fixed a number of security vulnerabilities found in an audit.
  • Angular 14 Migration – While this doesn’t impact our customers in any obvious way, this is a large undertaking to pay some technical debt.
  • Releases – We’ve made a number of improvements to the visibility of releases, particularly in the case where you want to prevent a release from being accessible but want to keep all its associations to tickets, etc intact.

The 22.2 ChangeLog details all the changes made in this release.

Download GForge 23.0 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

Health Checks: Commits

Health Checks: Commits

This category of health checks focuses on the code you check into your GForge Next project, how it relates to task management, team and file sizes.

Commits Per Tracker Item

Definition: The number of separate commits associated to each Tracker Item in your project. Only commits created in the last 90 days are used, so the trends will change over time.

What it means: Having too many commits makes it harder to understand the associated Tracker Item’s history later on. It can also skew Sprint, Burndown, and Release metrics to look bigger or smaller than they really are.

How to fix? Although you can add or remove associations between a commit and a Tracker Item, it’s better to look forward than try to change history. When planning a Sprint or Release, consider the size of each Tracker Item, and break them down into smaller tasks that might affect fewer files, or involve fewer iterations for each TI.

Commits with Tracker Items

Definition: The percentage of commits in the last 90 days that are associated (or not) to a Tracker Item. Also checks for commits that are tied to more than on TI.

What it means: Pushing commits without an associated task is an easy way to mess up your code base over time. It’s also bad for team collaboration and Sprint and/or Release tracking.

How to fix? To fix existing commits, you can create Tracker Items, and associate them using the SCM Commits listing. Click a commit and use the “Tracker Item Associations” section at the bottom of the commit details view.

You can (and should) also fix the process for pushing commits to your project:

  1. Go to the Project Admin SCM tab, and choose “Require” for the “Associate Tracker Items” option.
  2. You might also check the “Restrict Tracker Item Associations” setting, depending on whether you want to allow associations between commits in this project and Tracker Items from other projects.
  3. Usually, this setting should be “Yes” to keep it to the current project.

Committers

Definition: The number of users with commits in the last 90 days, and the proportion of all commits made by each user.

What it means: For smaller projects (with only one or two contributors) this check won’t mean much. For full-sized Agile teams (4-5 contributors) or larger, traditional teams (10 or more contributors), this check can help you understand if work is balanced properly between team members.

How to fix? If you’re not using Tracker Items (and requiring that commits tie to them), then you should start right away. Having a specific task should be required in order to make code changes anyway, and an official task list lets the Product Owner, Scrum Master, or even the team itself to balance tasks among contributors by size, functional area and dependencies. Proper task balancing will lead to balanced commits from the team.

Files Per Commit

Definition: The number of files changed (or added, or removed) by each commit. Only commits created in the last 90 days are used, so the trends will change over time.

What it means: In general, commits should touch less than ten files. Large commits (many files and/or many lines of code) are harder to review, harder to understand later, and more likely to cause merge conflicts with other commits.

How to fix? This is another one where what’s done is done. Going forward, make sure that the team is doing proper analysis on task sizes during planning, and on the changes to be made when working each task. If a specific task requires changing many files, try to find a way to iterate on it, changing a few files in one commit, reviewing/merging that commit, then moving on to the next set of files.

Of course, sometimes you’ll just need to bite the bullet – a breaking change in a dependency/library, an urgent security fix, etc. But those hefty commits should be the exception and not the rule.

Introducing: Project Health Checks

Introducing: Project Health Checks

GForge Next has everything that teams need to plan, execute, and document their work. You can start with simple features like kanban and source control, add workflow steps, code reviews and wiki articles, even integrate your build process and Zoom meetings.

But embracing all of these features and flexibilities can eventually make anyone feel a little lost:

On the one hand, we want all of these features. We need them. OTOH, we can’t (or really, really don’t want to) pay for training or plugins, or spend hours in Stack Overflow, to get the best use out of the tools we’re already paying for.

What we really need is a tool that tells us how we’re doing as we use it. Automatically. One that grows with our usage, making recommendations that apply to our process. Most importantly, one that doesn’t get in the way of actual productivity.

That’s why, starting in version 23.0, we’re rolling out a new item in Project Admin Reports called Project Health Checks. This new report will be run automatically against each active project in GForge Next, and provide insight, metrics and advice on features you may want to use, configuration options that need tweaking, or processes that may not be working for you. All of these Checks are designed to help you spend less time on your tools and more time getting things done.

Data + Analytics = Advice

Because GForge Next is a single service (with a single API and database), we can take a comprehensive view of each project – from users and roles, to releases, tasks and sprints, to the code changes, and even the configuration of access controls, workflow and integration settings – and look for patterns across all types of related data.

Report Format

The Project Health Check is run automatically once a month, and all project admins are notified when results are available. Each report is organized into Categories, Checks, and Results:



In the screen shot above, “Commits” is the Category. Other Categories include Tasks, Sprints/Releases, Backlog, and Project Configuration, and more are planned for later this year.

Within each Category are a number of Checks, each of which looks for a single kind of pattern, warning, or possible improvement.

Each Check can yield one or more Results, depending on how many Users, Trackers, or other related data appears in your Project.

You can collapse and expand Categories and Checks. Collapsed sections will show summary counts of the Results that are hidden, like the colored boxes at the top of the report.

Result Types

Checks fall into these categories:

  • Green boxes are OK/Success results, which shows that your project is performing well in this area.
  • Yellow boxes are Warning results. These don’t necessarily indicate a problem, but a trend that’s going the wrong way, or an easy opportunity for improvement.
  • Red boxes are Failed results. These results may point to a problem with your process, or a measurement that is way outside recommended boundaries.

Navigation and Customization

For the Warning and Failure Results, clicking on the result will take you to a blog post, wiki article or video with details about the issue, why it might affect you, and how to fix it.

Our Health Checks make some assumptions about projects and teams in general, and not all of these assumptions will apply to your situation. If there are Checks or Results that don’t make sense, you can turn them off completely, and exclude them from totals and future Health Check reports. Disabled Checks can be re-enabled at the bottom of the report.

What’s Next?

As we start running Health Checks for SaaS customers, GForge staff will be contacting project admins directly to offer personalized walkthroughs of the data, discuss fixes, process improvements, or GForge Next features that might help, and get feedback on wording, content, and future Checks to be implemented. SaaS users can also use the “Get Support” button anytime to request help with this new feature.

GForge 22.2 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 22.2. This release is primarily a bug-fix release with a fair number of new features included!

Key Highlights in 22.2

  • HTTP/2 Support added – To learn more about the benefits of HTTP/2 here.
    • Tickets can now be filtered based on whether or not they have attachments.
    • Tickets can also be filtered based on they have a parent and/or child ticket.
    • Users can now react (thumbs up/down) on comments.
  • File Uploads – Fixed the issue where file uploads would die after 20MB regardless of the configured value.
  • REST API – Updated missing and incomplete documentation.
  • Site Admin – Searching projects by name has been improved.
  • Browse Projects – Users could only search for projects they knew about in prior GForge versions. This version allows users to browse all projects they have access to.

Looking Ahead to 23.0

We want to point out some important changes coming in GForge 23.0 (spring 2023). This version will add support for Kubernetes and it is going to have a new ticket editor. We’d love to get some feedback on the new editor before it is released so if you would like a sneak peak you can register a test project or you can send us an email and we can shoot over some screenshots. Additionally, for you users interested in Kubernetes, if you have any specific questions or would like to beta test this in your environment we’d love to hear form you. Just contact us at feedback@gforgegroup.com.

The 22.2 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Download GForge 22.2 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 22.1 Released!

GForge v22.1 is primarily a bug fix release with a fair number of new features included!

GForge Now Supports Windows

Over the years we have been asked numerous times if GForge can run under windows. The complexities of GForge’s collaboration features had tied us completely to Linux. When we released our first version of GForgeNext under Docker we saw a future that might eventually include Windows. Today is that day.

You’re probably wondering why now when Docker has been out for years. The key lies in GForge’s interactions with the host filesystem and now with WSL (Windows Subsystem in Linux) those final hurdles have been dealt with.

GForge Includes Podman Support

We’re not here to ding Docker, it’s served us well for many years. That said, their approach to virtualization has caught the eye of many in the security world and because of that Podman was born. Podman was built to do everything Docker does but addressing many of the security concerns in Docker. With all that in mind, GForge now support Podman in addition to Docker. As important, your choice of Podman vs Docker is independent of your choice of Linux vs Window+WSL.

Other Key Highlights in v22.1

  • Tickets
    • Tickets can now be filtered based on whether or not they have attachments.
    • Tickets can also be filtered based on they have a parent and/or child ticket.
    • Users can now react (thumbs up/down) on comments.
  • Chat – We have added a few useful macros. For example you can search StackOverflow, Microsoft, and Wikipedia. You can also send private messages to a specific user. To see all of the supported macros just type “/help”.
  • Markdown – Anywhere GForge supports markdown now includes support for tables.
  • Version Control – All the repository homepages now include a link to a GForge-specific FAQ addressing common issues our customers have using Git, SVN and CVS

The 22.1 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Download GForge 22.1 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 22.0 Released!

GForge v22.0 is primarily a feature release with a fair number of bug fixes included

Introducing Planning Boards

You already know GForge allows you to plan, distribute and track your work. With GForge you are already able to plan a release, break the release down into manageable sprints and assign work to your team. Planning Boards gives our existing kanban features a big shot in the arm by allowing you to create boards and quickly begin moving work around. The image below gives an example of moving tickets in a release into sprints and assigning the work out.

We’ll be sharing a deeper dive covering Planning Boards on here and on our YouTube Channel.

Other Key Highlights in v22.0

Project Navigation – We’ve made a big improvement to the project navigation bar. The new version now groups related project features and adds labels. The prior version assumed you knew the icon for each feature).

  • Tickets
    • There are cases where you want to have tickets in one project reference commits made in other projects. The commits tab in the ticket editor will now show the commit data.
    • There is a printable version of a ticket.
  • Documents – You can now add tags to documents.
  • Version Control – There’s been a number of improvements:
    • For Git repositories we’ve replaced the “master” branch with the name “main” (this only applies to new projects)
    • We’ve added a script to convert CVS repositories to Git
    • Some minor bug fixes (see ChangeLog below for more information)
  • Admin:
    • We now have the ability to share a software bill of materials (SBOM) listing all the libraries and packages GForge uses in each release. You can request the SBOM by email feedback@gforgegroup.com
    • Projects can now to exported from one GForge instance and imported into another GForge instance assuming both instances are running the same version of GForge.

The 22.0 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Check back soon as we’ll be sharing our plans for the rest of 2022!

Download GForge 22.0 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 21.2 Released!

GForge v21.2 is primarily a bug fix release. You will notice that there aren’t that many tickets in this release because we continued to focus on core technologies (libraries, etc) that needed to be upgraded. Specifically, a lot of energy was focused on upgrading to Angular 1.6.

Highlights in GForge 21.2

  • OIDC Support – GForge now supports OIDC and works with SSO systems like Okta.
  • Site Search – When inside a project, the navbar search now allows a way for you to search outside the current project (i.e. across all your projects and their artifacts)
  • Reports – There’s a couple of new reports for Site Administrators including a Cron History and Audit Log Reports.
  • Site Administration – We’ve added data retention settings for purging cron history and activity log data.
  • Kanban – The user interface has been completely revamped when working with tickets in Kanban view.
  • SVN – There’s been a number of improvements. The most notable is we’ve improved the speed of SVN operations (especially repositories with a lot of files). Also for repositories using SSH we fixed an ACL issue.

The 21.2 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we have officially dropped support as of October of 2020. We will still answer any support questions about older releases but we will not be providing any future code updates or patches. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Check back soon as we’ll be sharing our plans for the rest of 2022!

Download GForge 21.2 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 21.0 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 21.0. This is largely a feature release with a number of bug fixes sprinkled in..

Highlights in GForge 21.0

  • Tickets: You can now create and update tickets using a CVS.
  • Tickets: Go to any ticket you have access to using the # in the search bar (e.g #1234)
  • Tickets: When saving a ticket, all validation errors are shown in a modal window.
  • Tracker: You can create reports that filter using keywords, tags and submitter.
  • Documents: You can now upload entire folders (drag-n-drop supported)
  • My Reports: We made major improvements to the scalability and speed when running large reports.
  • Releases: We added a new Downloads report. GForge was already tracking the download data so this will work for all existing projects.
  • Git/SVN/CVS: You can now share links directly to files in the GForge interface (authentication/authorization checks are performed).
  • Git/SVN/CVS: You can now require a commit message without having to require a ticket number.
  • LDAP: We now ship a script that will disable GForge accounts for users no longer in LDAP.
  • We have published the “Tour” button content for any pages that had no content.

The 21.0 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we have officially dropped support as of October of 2020. We will still answer any support questions about older releases but we will not be providing any future code updates or patches. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Check back soon as we’ll be sharing our plans for the rest of 2021!

Download GForge 21.0 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 20.2 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 20.2. This is largely a bug fix release with a handful of new features.

Highlights in GForge 20.2

  • Large File Uploads – GForge now implements chunked uploading which allows you to upload files in up to gigabytes in size, if desired. This has been implemented anywhere file uploads are allowed but specifically for Docs, attachments to tickets, releases and for importing SVN dump files. (Note: there are a few settings you must set to achieve this).
  • Docs – You can now upload and an extract a zip. This is great for moving a large number of files.
  • French Translation – 20.2 now support French in addition to English and Spanish.
  • Organizations – There have been a large number of improvements to organizations. Key changes include:
    • Organization homepage gets a facelift which includes showing all the projects in the org and GForge shows how many users in your organization and the disk usage across all projects.
    • You can create a project from the organization homepage which ensures the project is properly related to the org.
  • WYSIWYG – Now uses local storage to help prevent loss of edits.
  • PostgreSQL 13 – GForge now support PostgreSQL 13. The upgrade process will give you the option of making the switch or staying with PostgreSQL 9.
  • DevOps – A number of important improvements to the GForge environment have been made to improve overall availability. These changes will be transparent to you but if you contact us we’d be happy to share them.

The 20.2 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we have officially dropped support as of October of 2020. We will still answer any support questions about older releases but we will not be providing any future code updates or patches. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge 20.2 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 20.1 Released!

GForge 20.1 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 20.1. This is largely a bug fix release with a handful of new features.

Highlights in GForge 20.1

  • CloudForge Migration – With CloudForge shutting down on October 1st, you can now import CloudForge/TeamForge projects into next.gforge.com.
  • Thumbnail Generation – Office documents, PDFs and image files will have thumbnail images generated in tickets and in the document manager.
  • Workflow Locking – You can now lock tickets as part of a workflow transition.
  • Wiki Locks – You can now lock wiki pages.
  • Ticket Comments – You can now edit or delete your own comments on tickets.
  • WYSIWYG – Editor now elegantly handles content pasted from other sources (PDFs, websites, etc).
  • CVS – GForgeNext has added support for CVS to compliment the existing support for Subversion (SVN) and Git.

The 20.1 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge 20.1 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext