GForge 20.1 Released!

GForge 20.1 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 20.1. This is largely a bug fix release with a handful of new features.

Highlights in GForge 20.1

  • CloudForge Migration – With CloudForge shutting down on October 1st, you can now import CloudForge/TeamForge projects into next.gforge.com.
  • Thumbnail Generation – Office documents, PDFs and image files will have thumbnail images generated in tickets and in the document manager.
  • Workflow Locking – You can now lock tickets as part of a workflow transition.
  • Wiki Locks – You can now lock wiki pages.
  • Ticket Comments – You can now edit or delete your own comments on tickets.
  • WYSIWYG – Editor now elegantly handles content pasted from other sources (PDFs, websites, etc).
  • CVS – GForgeNext has added support for CVS to compliment the existing support for Subversion (SVN) and Git.

The 20.1 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge 20.1 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

GForge 2020 Released!

GForge 2020 Released!

We’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge 2020 (aka 20.0). This is a large feature release and also includes a number of bug fixes.

Highlights in GForge 2020

Zoom Integration – You can now create Zoom meetings and invite project team members to the meeting right from GForge (SaaS only).

oAuth Support – You can now log-in to GForge using your Google account (additional oAuth providers will be coming).

Auto Tagging – When users push commits, GForge will now automatically tag the user, project and ticket with any technologies identified in the commit (e.g. Java, XML, JavaScript).

Code Search – GForge now indexes Git and SVN repositories allowing you to search your codebase right from GForge.

Git LFS – GForge now supports Large File Storage (LFS) for Git repositories.

DKIM Support – For on-premises customers, GForge now supports DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) which adds additional email security and SPAM protection.

The 2020 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge 2020 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

Big Changes Ahead for GForge in 2020

Big Changes Ahead for GForge in 2020

With 2020 well underway we are hard at work on a bunch of new features that will take your collaboration to the next level. Before we cover what’s in store, be sure to checkout a recap of the “Top 8 GForge Features from 2019” 

OAuth Support – Not only will GForge support OAuth, over time we will include support services like Google, ADFS and GitHub.

Conferencing Support – GForge will be looking to add support to conferencing solutions like Zoom.us and WebEx allowing you to launch meetings right from within GForge.

Auto Tagging – There’s a lot of information in a commit. In 2020 GForge will harvest information from commits to provide better analytics. For example, a commit including Java, Javascript and SQL changes will add tags with those technologies to both the project and the author. Similarly, GForge will tag individual tickets in the same manner.

Git Improvements – GForge will be adding Git Large File Support (LFS) this year allowing individual files of up to 2GB to be included as part of pushes.

GitHub Migration – GForge will allow you to import projects from GitHub into GForge which will migrate the Git repository and GitHub Issues.

Workflow Improvements – GForge will add webhook support to ticket workflows allowing for deeper integration. Additionally GForge will include support to lock tickets as part of the existing workflows.

Document Thumbnails – Anywhere you add documents in GForge including tickets, Docman, etc GForge will generate thumbnail images you can preview before deciding if you want to download them.

Survey of 2020 Features

Top 8 GForge Features in 2019

Top 8 GForge Features in 2019

It’s the end of February and while we are hard at work adding new collaboration features to GForge for 2020, this seems like a good time to quickly reflect on what was accomplished in 2019. To help set the stage here’s some raw numbers for you!

  • In total we added 138 new features to GForge.
  • 255 bugs were squashed
  • We pushed over 1100 commits

What’s missing in those numbers are the key accomplishments from 2019 so let’s take a moment to cover the top 8 features from last year!

  1. Dark Mode!
Screenshot of GForge in “Dark Mode”

We admit, while Dark Mode adds little in the way of true business value, those who use Dark Mode in other applications and spend a lot of time in GForge will appreciate this.

2. Sprint Retrospectives

Add a Retrospective to closed sprints.

When closing sprints in GForge you can now add a retrospective to document what went well, where problems arose and you can begin identifying the steps needed to make improvements going forward.

3. Automated Release Notes

Import Release Notes with the Click of a Button

When you close a release you can import a table of all closed tickets in the release and then edit the Release Notes before publishing them.

4. Service Desk

GForge Service Desk in Action.

We added the ability for you to add user groups to your projects. In addition to making access control easier, this means you can now use GForge as a Service Desk solution complete with email integration.

Other Key Features

In addition to the highlights above, there are a few other features from 2019 worth noting.

  • Authentication Improvements – Last year GForge added SSO support along with the ability for GForge admins to moderate new user accounts even when using LDAP or SSO.
  • Offline Installations – Need to collaborate on projects inside a protected network without outbound internet access? GForge now supports offline installs and upgrades.
  • Portfolio Management – You can now organize all your GForge projects to match your organizational structure. Not only does this improve analytics, now when you assign users to organizational units they will only have access to private projects within their organization (public projects are still accessible).
  • Subversion (SVN) Improvements – GForge now allows you to restrict access to specific paths in your SVN repository on a role-by-role basis. We also added code review support for projects using SVN.

As excited as we are about what we’ve accomplished in 2019, 2020 will bring a lot more collaboration features to the table. Whet your appetite by reading the “Big Changes Ahead for GForge in 2020”.

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GForge v19.2 Released!

GForge's new Dark ModeWe’re happy to announce the immediate availability of GForge v19.2. This release includes three dozen new features and a number of bug fixes.

Download GForge v19.2 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

Highlights in GForge v19.2

Dark Mode – GForge is joining the Dark Mode fray!

Project Groups – Project leads can now create groups of users and assign them a project role. Prior to this release only GForge admins could create groups.

Service Desk – With the addition of Project Groups, GForge can now be used to provide service desk functionality.

Improved Analytics – We’ve been listening and now we delivered. GForge now includes better analytics for better managing your projects and overall project portfolio.

Automated Release Notes – This version of GForge provides improved release management. Now when you complete a release you can, with the click of a button, generate release notes.

Better Navigation – While we’ve received a lot of positive feedback on getting around in GForge, we’ve answered calls to improve navigation.

The v19.2 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge v19.2 Now!

GForge v19.1 Released!

Role-based ACLs for Git
GForge supports role-based ACLs for Git and SVN

We’re happy to announce our second GForge release for 2019 is available! v19.1 adds a number of new features and comes with a number of bug fixes.

Download GForge v19.1 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

Highlights in GForge v19.1

Role-based ACLs for Subversion (SVN) and Git – GForge now supports role-based access controls for both Subversion (SVN) and Git. This means you can control what areas in your repository users have access to based on their role in the project. In SVN this means you can limit a roles access to certain paths in your SVN repository (e.g. write access to anything in /branches and read-only access to /trunk). For Git this works similarly where GForge allows you specify which specific branches a user has access to.

Code Reviews in Subversion (SVN) – Beginning with GForge v18.0, you could perform code reviews in Git just fine. GForge now supports the same functionality using SVN.

Embedded Video Support – You can now embed online videos in many places in GForge including tickets, wiki entries, project homepages, etc. This support is included anywhere where the GForge WYSISYG editor is used.

Commit Integrity – When it comes to commits GForge tries to stay out of your way. One example is you can associate a commit to any ticket that is part of a project you belong to but the ticket doesn’t have to reside in the same project. While that can be handy, in some cases you need deeper control so in this release we’ve added two features ensuring commit integrity:

    1. There is a new configuration option that will tell GForge to enforce the committer is currently assigned to the ticket associated with the commit.
    2. Another new configuration option will tell GForge to enforce the repository being committed to is the same project the associated ticket is part of.

The v19.1 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.

Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge v19.1 Now!

GForge v19.0 Released!

We’re happy to announce our first GForge release for 2019 is available! v19.0 adds a number of new features and comes with a number of bug fixes.

Download GForge v19.0 Now!

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

Highlights in GForge v19.0

Sprint Retrospectives – For Agile and Scrum teams GForge already lets you create, track and manage the burndown of your sprints. In 19.0 can now assess and reflect on sprints with Sprint Retrospectives. Retrospectives include a report of key metrics and then allow you to provide a narrative to identify what worked well, what challenges you had and come up with actions and ideas going forward.

Tickets: Related Items – A challenge for all teams is reducing duplicated work. When creating new tickets, GForge will now identify related items allowing you to quickly determine if you are working on a problem that has already been identified and possibly fixed. GForge can show its own related tickets as well as possible matches on StackOverflow.

Offline Installation/Upgrades – If you need to install or upgrade GForge in a secure location in your network on a host that doesn’t have outbound internet connectivity GForge now supports offline installations and upgrades.

Moderated LDAP/SSO Accounts – You can now configure GForge to send new accounts registered via LDAP/SSO to a queue where they await formal approval by a GForge Administrator.

Organization – For customers with large project portfolios you can now organize your project into organizations. Organizations also provide the organization a place where they can collaborate across projects inside the organization.

  • The v19.0 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.
  • The GForgeNext FAQ will answer most of your questions but don’t hesitate to send additional questions.
  • Just a reminder for customers still running GForge Advanced Server (v6.4.5 and prior) we are planning on officially dropping support in October of 2020. Please feel free to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade paths.

Download GForge v19.0 Now!

GForge v18.1 Released!

Just a little over a month ago we ushered a completely revamped GForge platform dubbed GForgeNext and today we are happy to announce the release of v18.1.  Please remember we have changed our version numbering to reflect the year and the number of the release. Since this is the second release of 2018 this version coincides to v18.1 which should help customers quickly know how many versions behind they may be.

Take a tour of GForgeNext!

Getting Started with GForgeNext

The biggest change in 18.1 is the addition of SVN commit hooks. This means that all customers using both Git and SVN can safely upgrade to this version. For our remaining customers still using CVS we will be adding that support in v19.0 due out the first quarter of next year.

  • The v18.1 ChangeLog will help you understand the changes you can expect.
  • The GForgeNext FAQ will answer most of your questions but don’t hesitate to send additional questions.
  • We are still encouraging customers to reach out to us for a free consultation on the planning and upgrade process. If we don’t hear form you we will be reaching out to all our customers over the coming week.

Download GForge v18.1 Now!

Signs That You’ve Outgrown Github, Part 3: Merges

This is part 3 in a series about the limitations of Github, and how they might be holding your team back from its full potential. If you want to go back and catch up, here’s Part 1 and Part 2.

Go ahead, I’ll wait right here.

Done? Okay, let’s move on.

Today’s discussion is about getting code merged. It’s one of the most fundamental things any software team has to do. If your team is anything like ours, it’s something you do many times every day. It might even be the kickoff for your Continuous Integration/Delivery process, as it is for us.

Reliable merging is the key to getting multiple things done at once

Getting things out quickly is important, but preventing outages from bad code is even more important. You probably want an easy way to review and even test code that doesn’t distract too much from the work you’re already doing.

Once again, Github has a wonderful system for promoting code from one repository or branch to another — the Pull Request (PR herein). In particular, the PR is great for open-source projects where people might want to contribute, even if they’re not members of the main project. The proposed contributions can be examined by the main project member(s) and be pulled in only if they’re helpful.

Typical Github pull request — you can see the code changes and their purpose, all in one place

But like many other Github features, you may find the PR process to be mis-aligned to your needs, in a way that creates a little extra delay and a bit of confusion every time you use it.

Pull Requests 101

For those who haven’t tried one yet, a pull request (PR) is a special kind of task, asking someone to merge a set of changes (commits) from one place to another. In more general terms, you can think of it as promoting a chunk of work from one level to another — such as from a development branch to test and then to production, or from a hotfix branch to long-term-support.

A simple example of promotion — taking a specific change from one environment to another

Because it’s a request, it doesn’t involve any access to the project repository from any non-members. The project team can review the proposed changes and take them, ask for revisions, or ignore them. It’s a great model for open-source or otherwise loosely-coupled groups to share ideas and improvements.

Keep It In One Place

But that flexibility comes at a cost. Pull Requests are opened and managed separately from individual tasks, so you’re basically creating another task to review each task’s work. The open or closed status of each task can be independent of the status of the related PR. Additionally, there’s nothing stopping someone from submitting changes for multiple tasks in one PR, which can be confusing and difficult to review.

For software teams that aren’t open-source, this loose coupling actually creates more process, more overhead, and time thinking that could be spent doing instead.

Ask yourself — wouldn’t it be a lot easier to merge the code as an integral part of the task itself?

Singularity Of Purpose

Let’s start with an assumption — that in order to change your code, there should be a defined reason for doing so.

You’re writing code because something needs to be added or fixed. There’s a use case. A story. A bug. A feature. A customer who wants something. There’s a reason to change what you already have.

You probably also want to do two things with your tasks:

  1. You want to create a plan ahead of time, for which things will be done, by whom, in what order.
  2. You want to keep track of progress as things move along.

Once you start depending on tasks for planning and tracking, you can begin to improve your overall process, reducing the number of steps and the distance between idea and working code. As you do, separate PRs may start to lose their appeal. Asking developers to open a separate kind of ticket to get code merged is a hassle. Allowing them to put multiple bug fixes into one merge is asking for confusion and mistakes.

If you’re delivering code using a well-defined workflow, PRs can actually cause problems:

  • Audit trail — It’s difficult (or impossible) to know later which code changes went with which task.
  • Larger merges — the code review itself becomes much more complicated, since there are more commits, more changes files.
  • All or nothing — If you like the changes for task #1, and for task #2, but there are problems with the tests for task #3, the whole PR is sent back for rework. This means you’re likely sitting on changes for longer.
  • More conflicts — Pretty simple math: (Larger merges) + (All or nothing) = More conflicts.

Since there’s no way in Github to limit the content of a PR, there’s no good way to prevent this kind of behavior. Creating a PR for every single bug becomes a tedious time-sink that doesn’t add value to your day.

Now, you might argue that a Github PR can act as the task itself, and it does — but not really. PRs are only retrospective, meaning that you create one after (or while) doing the work. If you don’t create tasks before doing the work, then you’ll never have any way of planning or tracking progress.

Simplify, Simplify

For most teams, the overlap between tasks and PRs is additional work that doesn’t generate any value. What you really need is a way to automatically detect code changes, review those changes and then promote them to dev, test and production, all as part of the task.

This kind of integration means that you can go back to the task later, understand the intent of the change, and also see the code changes that went with it. Your task tracking becomes a source of institutional memory, so that people can move in and out of the team, or across different features without making old mistakes over and over again.

If your tools are preventing you from improving your process, maybe it’s time to improve your tools.

Come try GForge Next for simple, comprehensive and elegant collaboration.